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Vernacular Architecture: A Term Denoting and Transporting Diverse Content

Abstract

A selective review of the literature demonstrates the difficulty in defining ‘vernacular architecture’. Recent studies have presented an overly narrow, single-sided, or even unacceptable image of the topic in comparison with many earlier definitions and discussions. However, those earlier analyses also had various shortfalls. The interdependence of vernacular architecture, economic interests, and emerging awareness of buildings’ interaction with the environment demand a rethinking of vernacular architecture, which the present study understands as signifying housing offered for most of the world’s population.

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Correspondence to Klaus Zwerger.

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Zwerger, K. Vernacular Architecture: A Term Denoting and Transporting Diverse Content. Built Heritage 3, 14–25 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1186/BF03545716

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Keywords

  • vernacular architecture
  • interdependence
  • resource scarcity
  • changed expectations
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