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New Lives, New Landscapes. Landscape, Heritage and Rural Revitalisation: Whose Cultural Values?

Abstract

Worldwide interest in the cultural landscape concept—covering rural and urban spheres—is now a major theme in considerations of the management of cultural heritage places. The roots of this interconnection lie in the social, political and economic relationships between people and landscape which, in turn, is related to how human attachment to landscape plays a major role in determining our sense of place. Notably the fundamental actuality of place attachment through landscape is cross cultural. Epistemologically it crosses the boundaries of differing values across diverse cultures underscoring the fundamental cross cultural significance of landscape. Co-incidentally the phenomenon of the ‘rise of cultural landscapes’ (Jacques 1995) has been intimately interconnected with the way in which thinking has changed— philosophically and professionally—on what heritage is. There is in effect a clear link between heritage and landscape. It is in this context that this paper addresses challenges of thinking and acting associated with China’s commitment to a rural revitalisation program.

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Correspondence to Ken Taylor.

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Taylor, K. New Lives, New Landscapes. Landscape, Heritage and Rural Revitalisation: Whose Cultural Values?. Built Heritage 3, 50–63 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1186/BF03545727

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Keywords

  • landscape
  • culture
  • heritage
  • identity
  • authenticity
  • rural revitalisation
  • tourism
  • traditional villages