Skip to main content

Volume 2 Supplement 2

20th-Century Heritage: Exploring the New Futures of the Recent Past

West of Japan/East of Europe: Translating Architectural Legacies and the Case of Bruno Taut’s Hyuga Villa

Abstract

Based on communications presented at the international symposium ‘West of Japan/East of Europe’, hosted by the Department of Architecture at Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University in concomitance with the exhibition ‘Bruno Taut’s Hyuga Villa in Atami, Japan’, this text discusses the question of cultural translation in architecture departing from the example of Hyuga Villa, realised by Taut in 1936. Despite the inherently immobile status of architecture, architectural ideas travel widely, as well as their conceivers, the architects. The cultural passage implicit to translation is never flawless, though. Hyuga Villa offers a good case in point, since it was conceived by an architect who had only a partial grasp of local culture and who tried to integrate elements of both Western and Japanese design. But what are the implications of ‘translating’ architecture? Can we translate not only words but also images, details, building conventions, even aesthetic sensitivities? And is everything translatable? Applied to an artifact recognised today as an important testimony to the encounter between Western and Eastern design cultures, these questions relate to issues that are central to the debate on both architectural history and built heritage, proposing an alternative approach in terms of method and scope.

References

  1. Bédarida, Marc. 1987. “Rue de Sèvres, 35. L’envers du décor.” In Le Corbusier, une enciclopédie, 354–359. Paris: Centre Pompidou.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Bourdieu, Pierre. 1979. La Distinction. Critique sociale du jugement. Paris: Éditions de Minuit.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Bourdieu, Pierre. 2002. “Les conditions sociales de la circulation internationale des idées.” Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales, 145: 3–8.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  4. Canclini, Néstor García. 1990. Culturas híbridas. Estrategias para entrar y salir de la modernidad. México D. F.: Grijabo - Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Ceccarelli, Paolo. 2017. “Past is not a Frozen Concept: Considerations about Heritage Conservation in a Fast Changing World.” Built Heritage 1 (3): 1–12.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  6. Cohen, Jean-Louis. 2007. “Introduction.” In Le Corbusier. Toward an Architecture, 1–78. Los Angeles: The Getty Research Institute.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Colomina, Beatriz. 1994. Privacy and Publicity: Modern Architecture as Mass Media. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Chatterjee, Malay. 1985. “1960–1974: De retour de Chandigarh”. In Architectures en Inde, 132–135. Milan-Paris: Electa Moniteur.

    Google Scholar 

  9. De Andrade, Oswald. 2000. A utopia antropofágica. São Paulo: Globo.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Fairbank, Wilma. 1994. Liang and Lin: Partners in Exploring China’s Architectural Past. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Fraser, Valerie. 2000. Building the New World: Studies in the Modern Architecture of Latin America 1930–1960. London-New York: Verso.

    Google Scholar 

  12. Ghirardo, Diane. 1998. “Aldo Rossi en los Estados Unidos.” Block: Revista de cultura de la arquitectura, la ciudad y el territorio 3: 102–109.

    Google Scholar 

  13. González Martínez, Plácido. 2017. “Built Heritage Conservation and Contemporary Urban Development: The Contribution of Architectural Practice to the Challenges of Modernisation.” Built Heritage 1 (1): 14–25.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  14. Kuma, Kengo. 2007. Anti-Object? The Dissolution and Disintegration of Architecture. London: AA Publications.

    Google Scholar 

  15. Morse, Edward S. 1886. Japanese Homes and Their Surroundings. Boston: Ticknor and Company.

    Google Scholar 

  16. Pellnitz, Alexander. 2014. “Rossi e la Germania. Traduzione e ricezione del libro ‘LArchitettura della Città’.” In Aldo Rossi, la storia di un libro. L’architettura della città, dal 1966 ad oggi, edited by Fernanda De Maio, Alberto Ferlenga, and Patrizia Montini Zimolo, 212–221. Venice: Università Iuav di Venezia - Il Poligrafo.

    Google Scholar 

  17. Rossi, Aldo. 1966. LArchitettura della Città. Venice: Marsilio.

    Google Scholar 

  18. Shaw, Lauren. 2014. “Migrants as Translators’: Mediating External Influences on Post-World II Western Europe, 1945–1973.” Bulletin of the German Historical Institute 54: 125–130.

    Google Scholar 

  19. Speidel, Manfred, ed. 1994. Bruno Taut Retrospective. Nature and Fantasy. Tokyo: Treville.

    Google Scholar 

  20. Speidel, Manfred. 2006. “Il magnifico esilio giapponese.” Casabella 743: 45–51.

    Google Scholar 

  21. Sullivan, Michael. 1989. The Meeting of Eastern and Western Art. Berkeley-Los Angeles, Cal.: University of California Press.

    Google Scholar 

  22. Taut, Bruno. 1936. Fundamentals of Japanese Architecture. Tokyo: Kokusai Bunka Shinkokai.

    Google Scholar 

  23. Taut, Bruno. 1937. Houses and People of Japan. Tokyo: Sanseido.

    Google Scholar 

  24. Taut, Bruno. 2003. Ich liebe die japanische Kultur: Kleine Schriften über Japan. Berlin: Mann.

    Google Scholar 

  25. Taut, Bruno. 2009. Nippon mit europäischen Augen gesehen. Berlin: Mann.

    Google Scholar 

  26. Taut, Bruno. 2011. Japans Kunst mit europäischen Augen gesehen. Berlin: Mann.

    Google Scholar 

  27. The Formwork. 2016. “Kengo Kuma on Bruno Taut and Hyuga Villa in Atami - Interview.” Tokyo: Gaienmae. Accessed 5 January 2018. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NyDNnx1M8T0

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Paolo Scrivano.

Rights and permissions

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Scrivano, P., Capitanio, M. West of Japan/East of Europe: Translating Architectural Legacies and the Case of Bruno Taut’s Hyuga Villa. Built Heritage 2, 50–61 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1186/BF03545693

Download citation

Keywords

  • cultural translation
  • Bruno Taut
  • Japan
  • Hyuga Villa
  • emigration
  • professional mobility
  • European architecture
  • Asian architecture
  • heritage